The Paradox of Privacy: Revisiting a Core Library Value in an Age of Big Data and Linked Data

Protecting user privacy and confidentiality is fundamental to the ethics and practice of librarianship, and such protection constitutes one of eleven values in the American Library Association’s “Core Values of Librarianship” (2004).

This paper addresses the concerns of protecting privacy in the library as they relate to library users who are defining, exploring, and negotiating their sexual identities with the help of the library’s information, programming, and physical facilities.

In so doing, we enlist the aid of Garret Keizer, who, in Privacy (2012), articulates a fresh theory of the concept in light of American social life in the twenty-first century. Using Keizer’s theory, we examine these concerns within the context of the rise of big data systems and social media on the one hand, and linked data and new cataloging standards on the other.

In so doing, we suggest that linked data technologies, with their ability to lead searchers through self-directed, open inquiry, are superior to big data technologies in the navigation of the paradox between openness and secrecy.

In this way they offer a greater potential to support the needs of queer library users: lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, or questioning (LGBTQ).

URL : http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/library_trends/v064/64.3.campbell.html

Changing Roles of Librarians and Library Technicians

What significant changes are librarians and library technicians experiencing in their roles? A survey put forward across Canada to librarians and library technicians addressing this question was conducted in February 2014. Eight hundred eighty-two responses were obtained from librarians, defined as MLIS graduates, and library technicians, defined as graduates from a two-year library diploma program.

Respondents needed to have been employed in the last two years in these roles and students of either an MLIS or LIT program were also welcome to participate.

The results suggest that both librarians and library technicians perceive their roles as growing in scope and complexity and that the lines of responsibility are blurring. A majority of respondents indicated that they perceive a change in their roles in the past five years and commented on what the perceived changes were.

Librarian and library technician roles may be shifting away from what may be viewed as traditional or clearly defined responsibilities and both librarians and library technicians may be taking on new tasks as well as experiencing task overlap.All library staff will need to be fluid, adaptable, and open to change. Library school curricula and workplace training need to incorporate the development of these competencies.

URL : Changing Roles of Librarians and Library Technicians

Alternative location : https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/article/view/3333

Vers des bibliothèques de lecture publique sans livres imprimés ?

L’étude de l’évolution du discours et des données en matière de volumétrie documentaire permet-elle d’anticiper la mise en place de bibliothèques sans livres imprimés en France ? Quelles sont les origines et les caractéristiques principales de ces bibliothèques d’un nouveau genre et en quoi peuvent-elles constituer un modèle pour les bibliothèques de lecture publique françaises ?

La collection physique reste-t-elle le coeur de la bibliothèque à l’heure où les bibliothécaires accordent une importance croissante au bien-être de leurs usagers et entreprennent d’inscrire leur offre documentaire dans un environnement numérique ? Dans un contexte où les bibliothèques traversent une crise identitaire, tenter de répondre à ces questions constitue aujourd’hui une nécessité pour enrichir le débat portant sur l’avenir des bibliothèques.

URL : Vers des bibliothèques de lecture publique sans livres imprimés ?

Alternative location : http://www.enssib.fr/bibliotheque-numerique/notices/65759-vers-des-bibliotheques-de-lecture-publique-sans-livres-imprimes

A Two-Step Model for Assessing Relative Interest in E-books Compared to Print

Librarians often wish to know whether readers in a particular discipline favor e-books or print books. Because print circulation and e-book usage statistics are not directly comparable, it can be hard to determine the relative interest of readers in the two types of books. This study demonstrates a two-step method by which librarians can assess the appeal of books in various formats.

First, a nominal assessment of use or nonuse is performed; this eliminates the difficulty of comparing print circulation to e-book usage statistics.

Then, the comparison of actual use to Percentage of Expected Use (PEU) is made. By examining the distance between PEU of e-books to PEU of print books in a discipline, librarians can determine whether patrons have a strong preference for one format over another.

URL : http://m.crl.acrl.org/content/77/1/20

Changing Role of Academic Librarians in Open Access Environment

Application of information and communication technology is supporting various ways of scholarly communication. The transition from print to electronic and paid resources to open access resources has a great impact on information society and resulted open access movement. This paper enumerates various declarations on open access and discusses the impact of open access on libraries particularly on the role of academic librarians. On the basis of existing literature, an attempt has been made in this paper to understand transforming role of academic librarians and suggest new responsibilities in open access environment.

URL : Changing Role of Academic Librarians in Open Access Environment

Alternative location : http://irjlis.com/changing-role-of-academic-librarians-in-open-access-environment/

Research Data Services in Academic Libraries: Data Intensive Roles for the Future?

Objectives

The primary objectives of this study are to gauge the various levels of Research Data Service academic libraries provide based on demographic factors, gauging RDS growth since 2011, and what obstacles may prevent expansion or growth of services.

Methods

Survey of academic institutions through stratified random sample of ACRL library directors across the U.S. and Canada. Frequencies and chi-square analysis were applied, with some responses grouped into broader categories for analysis.

Results

Minimal to no change for what services were offered between survey years, and interviews with library directors were conducted to help explain this lack of change.

Conclusion

Further analysis is forthcoming for a librarians study to help explain possible discrepancies in organizational objectives and librarian sentiments of RDS.

URL : Research Data Services in Academic Libraries: Data Intensive Roles for the Future?

DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.7191/jeslib.2015.1085

Research data management services in academic research libraries and perceptions of librarians

The emergence of data intensive science and the establishment of data management mandates have motivated academic libraries to develop research data services (RDS) for their faculty and students. Here the results of two studies are reported: librarians’ RDS practices in U.S. and Canadian academic research libraries, and the RDS-related library policies in those or similar libraries. Results show that RDS are currently not frequently employed in libraries, but many services are in the planning stages.

Technical RDS are less common than informational RDS, RDS are performed more often for faculty than for students, and more library directors believe they offer opportunities for staff to develop RDS-related skills than the percentage of librarians who perceive such opportunities to be available. Librarians need opportunities to learn more about these services either on campus or through attendance at workshops and professional conferences.

URL : Research data management services in academic research libraries and perceptions of librarians

DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2013.11.003