Mots-clefs: social media. Afficher/masquer les discussions | Raccourcis clavier

  • Hans Dillaerts le 22 March 2012 à 18 h 23 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , social media.,   

    Altmetrics in the wild: Using social media to explore scholarly impact :

    « In growing numbers, scholars are integrating social media tools like blogs, Twitter, and Mendeley into their professional communications. The online, public nature of these tools exposes and reifies scholarly processes once hidden and ephemeral. Metrics based on this activities could inform broader, faster measures of impact, complementing traditional citation metrics. This study explores the properties of these social media-based metrics or « altmetrics », sampling 24,331 articles published by the Public Library of Science.

    We find that that different indicators vary greatly in activity. Around 5% of sampled articles are cited in Wikipedia, while close to 80% have been included in at least one Mendeley library. There is, however, an encouraging diversity; a quarter of articles have nonzero data from five or more different sources. Correlation and factor analysis suggest citation and altmetrics indicators track related but distinct impacts, with neither able to describe the complete picture of scholarly use alone. There are moderate correlations between Mendeley and Web of Science citation, but many altmetric indicators seem to measure impact mostly orthogonal to citation. Articles cluster in ways that suggest five different impact « flavors », capturing impacts of different types on different audiences; for instance, some articles may be heavily read and saved by scholars but seldom cited. Together, these findings encourage more research into altmetrics as complements to traditional citation measures. »

    URL : http://arxiv.org/abs/1203.4745

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 19 January 2012 à 12 h 31 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: Knowledge Dissemination, , , , social media.   

    Trends in Scholarly Communication and Knowledge Dissemination in the Age of Online Social Media :

    « It is no secret that Online Social Media (OSM) has become mainstream in recent years, and their adoption has skyrocketed. As a result of their growing popularity, numerous studies have been conducted on how the general public is using OSM. However, very little work has been done on how scholars are using and adapting to these new tools in their professional life. In an attempt to fill this significant gap in the research literature, we recently conducted a comprehensive online survey to discover if, how and why scholars are using these new media for communication and knowledge dissemination. In particular, we focussed on how academics in the social sciences use social media tools for professional purposes, and the implications that this might have on the future of scholarly communication and publishing practices in the age of online social media. »

    URL : http://socialmedialab.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/Gruzd_OSM_Survey_Summary_Nov11_2011.pdf

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 14 February 2011 à 17 h 25 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , social media.   

    Social media: A guide for researchers :

    « Social media is an important technological trend that has big implications for how researchers (and people in general) communicate and collaborate. Researchers have a huge amount to gain from engaging with social media in various aspects of their work.

    This guide has been produced by the International Centre for Guidance Studies, and aims to provide the information needed to make an informed decision about using social media and select from the vast range of tools that are available.

    One of the most important things that researchers do is to find, use and disseminate information, and social media offers a range of tools which can facilitate this. The guide discusses the use of social media for research and academic purposes and will not be examining the many other uses that social media is put to across society.

    Social media can change the way in which you undertake research, and can also open up new forms of communication and dissemination. It has the power to enable researchers to engage in a wide range of dissemination in a highly efficient way. »

    URL : http://www.rin.ac.uk/our-work/communicating-and-disseminating-research/social-media-guide-researchers

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 5 December 2010 à 22 h 09 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , , , social media.,   

    How and why scholars cite on Twitter :

    « Scholars are increasingly using the microblogging service Twitter as a communication platform. Since citing is a central practice of scholarly communication, we investigated whether and how scholars cite on Twitter. We conducted interviews and harvested 46,515 tweets from a sample of 28 scholars and found that they do cite on Twitter, though often indirectly. Twitter citations are part of a fast-moving conversation that participants believe reflects scholarly impact. Twitter citation metrics could augment traditional citation analysis, supporting a “scientometrics 2.0”. »

    URL : http://clintlalonde.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/201_Final_Submission.pdf

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