Mots-clefs: self-archiving Afficher/masquer les discussions | Raccourcis clavier

  • Hans Dillaerts le 25 March 2014 à 13 h 42 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , self-archiving, SHERPA RoMEO   

    Publisher Support for Self-Archiving: Laudatory or Predatory? :

    « Most publishers with self-archiving policies in the SHERPA RoMEO database allow authors to deposit their articles in a repository or post them to a website – supporting the green route to open access. Nevertheless, the Association of American Publishers (AAP) enthusiastically endorsed legislation proposed and defeated twice in the United States to prohibit federal agencies from mandating repository deposits of articles reporting on research they funded. The AAP also endorsed the Finch Report issued in the United Kingdom. The Report denigrated repository deposits and elevated open access publishing – the gold route to open access – as the preferred path to expand public access. Given that the green route is more affordable than the gold route (Houghton et al 2009), that the green route exceeds the gold route in growth rate and proportion of articles available open access (Gargouri et al 2012), and that mandates increase repository deposits (Van Noorden 2013, Poynder May 2012), these are puzzling tactics for publishers professing to support self-archiving.
    Despite conspicuous progress in providing open access to scholarly articles, there is a steady, unsettling undercurrent stirred by traditional publishers that could undermine the green route to open access. This article examines data and discourse to better understand publisher perspectives on self-archiving and, based on this understanding, urges action from open access advocates. »

    URL : http://works.bepress.com/denise_troll_covey/79/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 27 January 2014 à 17 h 44 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , self-archiving   

    arXiv e-prints and the journal of record: An analysis of roles and relationships :

    « Since its creation in 1991, arXiv has become central to the diffusion of research in a number of fields. Combining data from the entirety of arXiv and the Web of Science (WoS), this paper investigates (a) the proportion of papers across all disciplines that are on arXiv and the proportion of arXiv papers that are in the WoS, (b) elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication, and (c) the aging characteristics and scientific impact of arXiv e-prints and their published version. It shows that the proportion of WoS papers found on arXiv varies across the specialties of physics and mathematics, and that only a few specialties make extensive use of the repository. Elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication has shortened but remains longer in mathematics than in physics. In physics, mathematics, as well as in astronomy and astrophysics, arXiv versions are cited more promptly and decay faster than WoS papers. The arXiv versions of papers – both published and unpublished – have lower citation rates than published papers, although there is almost no difference in the impact of the arXiv versions of both published and unpublished papers. »

    URL : http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.3261

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 1 July 2013 à 18 h 20 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , , , self-archiving   

    The Critical Role of Institutional Services in Open Access Advocacy :

    « This paper examines the development of the Open Access movement in scholarly communication, with particular attention to some of the rhetorical strategies and policy mechanisms used to promote it to scholars and scientists. Despite the majority of journal publishers’ acceptance of author self-archiving practices, and the minimal time commitment required by authors to successfully self-archive their work in disciplinary or institutional repositories, the majority of authors still by and large avoid participation. The paper reviews the strategies and arguments used for increasing author participation in open access, including the role of open access mandates. We recommend a service-oriented approach towards increasing participation in open access, rather than rhetoric that speculates on the benefits that open access will have on text/data mining innovation. In advocating for open access participation, we recommend focusing on its most universal and tangible purpose: increasing public open (gratis) access to the published results of publicly funded research. Researchers require strong institutional support to understand the copyright climate of open access self-archiving, user-friendly interfaces and useful metrics, such as repository usage statistics. We recommend that mandates and well-crafted and responsive author support services at universities will ultimately be required to ensure the growth of open access. We describe the mediated deposit service that was developed to support author self-archiving in Spectrum: Concordia University Research Repository. By comparing the number of deposits of non-thesis materials (e.g. articles and conference presentations) that were accomplished through the staff-mediated deposit service to the number of deposits that were author-initiated, we demonstrate the relative significance of this service to the growth of the repository. »

    URL : http://www.ijdc.net/index.php/ijdc/article/view/8.1.84

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 19 June 2013 à 17 h 46 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , , self-archiving   

    Incentives, Integration, and Mediation: Sustainable Practices for Populating Repositories:

    « There is an active, thriving community of open access repositories worldwide and their visibility is rising as funding agencies and governments implement open access policies. Still, repositories must continue to adopt strategies that demonstrate their value to the wider research community. Therefore COAR has now published the report, “Incentives, Integration, and Mediation: Sustainable Practices for Population Repositories”. It profiles a variety of successful practices for populating repositories from around the world. Aim of thie report is to assist the global repository community in implementing sustainable methods for recruiting content. The profiles were gathered from organizations across the globe, and represent a mixture of approaches involving the introduction of incentives; integration of the repository with other institutional services; and/or mediation of the deposit process. The practices reflect a tradition of innovation and openness in the repository community, and are characterized by creative approaches to staffing, imaginative software developments, and adoption of novel policies. »

    URL : http://www.coar-repositories.org/activities/repository-content/sustainable-practices-for-populating-repositories-report/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 17 June 2013 à 16 h 24 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , self-archiving   

    arXiv e-prints and the journal of record: An analysis of roles and relationships :

    « Since its creation in 1991, arXiv has become central to the diffusion of research in a number of fields. Combining data from the entirety of arXiv and the Web of Science (WoS), this paper investigates (a) the proportion of papers across all disciplines that are on arXiv and the proportion of arXiv papers that are in the WoS, (b) elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication, and (c) the aging characteristics and scientific impact of arXiv e-prints and their published version. It shows that the proportion of WoS papers found on arXiv varies across the specialties of physics and mathematics, and that only a few specialties make extensive use of the repository. Elapsed time between arXiv submission and journal publication has shortened but remains longer in mathematics than in physics. In physics, mathematics, as well as in astronomy and astrophysics, arXiv versions are cited more promptly and decay faster than WoS papers. The arXiv versions of papers – both published and unpublished – have lower citation rates than published papers, although there is almost no difference in the impact of the arXiv versions of both published and unpublished papers. »

    URL : http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.3261

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 17 June 2013 à 15 h 40 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , , , self-archiving,   

    ‘Héloïse’: towards a co-ordinated ecosystem approach for the archiving of scientific publications? :

    « With the continued development of open access policies, it is important to promote consensus-building projects with the various stakeholders. This article gives an account of how such collaboration has facilitated the construction of the project Héloïse. This project is a French information service dedicated to describing the policies of French publishers on the self-archiving of scientific publications. Héloïse represents a real tool of mediation whose development involved much debate between publishers and research stakeholders. This article seeks to demonstrate that the development of trust between the actors involved in the project was a major component of its success. »

    URL : http://archivesic.ccsd.cnrs.fr/sic_00834411

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 23 April 2013 à 12 h 25 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , , , , self-archiving   

    Strategies for gaining and maintaining academic support for the institutional open access repository :

    « The impact of research can be measured by use or citation count. The more widely available that research outputs are; the more likely they are to be used, and the higher the impact. Making the author-manuscript version of research outputs freely available via the institutional repository greatly increases the availability of research outputs and can increase the impact.
    QUT ePrints, the open access institutional repository of research outputs at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia, was established in 2003 and is managed by the QUT Library. The repository now contains over 39,000 records. More than 21,000 of these records have full-text copies attached as result of continuous effort to maintain momentum and encourage academic engagement. The full-text deposit rate has continued to increase over time and, in 2012 (August, at the time of writing), 88% of the records for works published in 2012 provide access to a full-text copy.
    Achieving success has required a long term approach to collaboration, open access advocacy, repository promotion, support for the deposit process, and ongoing system development. This paper discusses the various approaches adopted by QUT Library, in collaboration with other areas of the University, to achieve success.
    Approaches include mainstreaming the repository via having it report to the University Research and Innovation Committee; regular provision of deposit rate data to faculties; championing key academic supporters; and holding promotional competitions and events such as during Open Access Week.
    Support and training is provided via regular deposit workshops with academics and faculty research support groups and via the provision of online self-help information. Recent system developments have included the integration of citation data (from Scopus and Web of Science) and the development of a statistical reporting system which incentivise engagement. »

    URL : http://eprints.qut.edu.au/59212/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 17 April 2013 à 22 h 51 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , self-archiving,   

    Recent developments in Open Access :

    « Open Access to the world’s research literature has been an obvious development since the emergence of the Internet. To everyone, it appears clear that the costs of disseminating research could drop dramatically. Yet, progress in achieving it is strangely slow. This paper explores recent developments in open access, including:
    • The recent Australian NH&MRC and ARC mandates for open access deposit in university repositories, and how universities are responding to them
    • The UK’s Finch Report, and Lord Krebs’ Committee Report
    • Recent USA and German developments
    • Gradual growth in open access journals, and the challenge for universities and their libraries of transferring reader-side fees (subscriptions) to author-side fees (publication charges)
    • The emergence of submission fees so that highly selective journals need not transfer all the costs of rejections onto successful articles
    • Fake conferences and journals which exist only to extract attendance or publication fees
    • Newer publishing models
    • The recent emergence of a third route to open access based on social networking.

    The delays in establishing an obvious developmental consequence of the Internet can largely be attributed to two factors: (a) academic apathy and inertia, and (b) publisher protection of profit margins and old business models. Neither of these can be expected to last. Of particular interest is the ‘Titanium Road’, a route to open access that is reliant on social networking. »

    URL : http://eprints.utas.edu.au/16321/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 31 March 2013 à 21 h 56 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , self-archiving,   

    Anatomy of Green Open Access :

    « Open Access (OA) is the free unrestricted access to electronic versions of scholarly publications. For peer reviewed journal articles there are two main routes to OA, publishing in OA journals (gold OA) or archiving of article copies or manuscripts at other web locations (green OA). This study focuses on summarizing and extending upon current knowledge about green OA. A synthesis of previous studies indicates that the green OA coverage of all published journal articles is approximately 12%, with substantial disciplinary variation. Typically, green OA copies become available with considerable time delays, partly caused by publisher imposed embargo periods, and partly by author tendencies to archive manuscripts only perio dically. Although green OA copies should ideally be archived in proper repositories, a large share is stored on home pages and similar locations, with no assurance of long-term preservation. Often such locations contain exact copies of published articles, which may infringe on the publisher’s exclusive rights. The technical foundation for green OA uploading is becoming increasingly solid, which is largely due to the rapid increase in the number of institutional repositories. The number of articles within th e scope of OA mandates, which strongly influence the self-archival rate of articles, is nevertheless still low. »

    URL : http://www.openaccesspublishing.org/apc8/Personal%20VersionGreenOa.pdf

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 25 February 2013 à 17 h 38 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , self-archiving   

    Open Access Self-archiving in Library and Information Science: Indian contribution to E-LIS Repository :

    « Open Access (OA) is a widely debated issue in the scientific community as well as in the publishing industry. Although people in all walks of life are greatly benefitted by the OA philosophy, libraries and information centres have been the prime beneficiaries of the new model of information access and delivery. The main objective of the OA ventures is to make the recorded scholarly output freely available to all readers over the Internet. The paper is a case study of E-LIS repository which provides open access LIS literature worldwide. The study found that India is the highest contributor to the repository among all the 42 Asian countries with 658 submissions followed by Turkey and China. M. S. Sridhar, former librarian of ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore found to be the highest individual contributors to E-LIS from India with 106 (234%) papers. »

    URL : http://eprints.rclis.org/18655/

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