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  • Hans Dillaerts le 18 April 2014 à 13 h 53 min Permalien | Connectez-vous pour laisser un commentaire
    Mots-clefs: , , , open repositories   

    Le développement de l’archive ouverte institutionnelle HAL-UPS : Préconisations pour la mise en place d’un workflow pour la chaîne de traitement documentaire des publications scientifiques des laboratoires de recherche de l’Université Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier :

    « État des lieux des politiques en matière d’archives ouvertes sur Toulouse et l’Université de Toulouse 3. Rappel historique sur la création de l’archive ouverte institutionnelle HAL-UPS. Tableaux récapitulatifs des pratiques en matière d’archives ouvertes par pôle disciplinaire sur l’Université Toulouse 3. Des préconisations sur les scénarios possibles de dépôts. »

    URL : http://archivesic.ccsd.cnrs.fr/sic_00977548

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 5 April 2014 à 10 h 43 min Permalien
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    Evaluer la qualité des archives ouvertes : le certificat DINI :

    « L’article présente le certificat DINI, un référentiel pour la certification et l’audit des archives ouvertes, des archives institutionnelles et des plateformes de revues en libre accès, développé par l’Initiative Allemande pour l’Information en Réseau DINI. L’article décrit le contexte, l’objectif et l’historique de ce certificat avant d’exposer sa structure et son contenu. Parmi les huit sections du certificat figurent la visibilité du site, la sécurité de l’information et l’archivage pérenne. La discussion porte sur l’objet du référentiel, sur son influence et sur la nécessité d’une adaptation au contexte francophone. La traduction française du certificat a été publiée en 2012. »

    « The article presents the DINI certificate, standard recommendations for the certification of document and publishing services, i.e. open archives, institutional repositories and platforms for open access journals, developed by the German Initiative for Networked Information DINI. The article describes the context, purpose and history of this certificate before exposing its structure and content. The eight areas include criteria for the visibility of the site, information security and long-term preservation. The article discusses the object of certification, its impact and the need to adapt some recommendations to the French-speaking context. The French translation of the certificate has been published in 2012. »

    URL : Evaluer la qualité des archives ouvertes : le certificat DINI
    Alternative URL : https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/article/view/2733

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 5 January 2014 à 16 h 17 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , , open repositories, SWOT   

    Open Is Not Enough : Grey Literature in Institutional Repositories :

    « The paper contributes to the discussion on the place of grey literature in institutional repositories and, vice versa, on the relevance of open archives for grey literature. Even in an open environment, grey literature needs specific attention and curation. Institutional repositories don’t automatically provide a solution to all problems of grey literature. Our paper shows some scenarios of what could or should be done. The focus is on academic libraries. The paper is based on a review of international studies on grey literature in open archives. Empirical evidence is drawn from an audit of the French repository IRIS from the University of Lille 1 and from ongoing work on the development of this site. The study includes a strategic analysis in a SWOT format with four scenarios. Based on this analysis, the paper provides a set of minimum requirements for grey items in institutional repositories concerning metadata, selection procedure, quality, collection management and deposit policy. The communication is meant to be helpful for the further development of institutional repositories and for special acquisition and deposit policies of academic libraries. »

    URL : http://archivesic.ccsd.cnrs.fr/sic_00908862

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 4 January 2014 à 17 h 24 min Permalien
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    The Choice Is Yours! Researchers Assign Subject Metadata to Their Own Materials in Institutional Repositories :

    « The Digital Commons platform for institutional repositories provides a three-tiered taxonomy of academic disciplines for each item submitted to the repository. Since faculty and departmental administrators across campuses are encouraged to submit materials to the institutional repository themselves, they must also assign disciplines or subject categories for their own work. The expandable drop-down menu of about 1,000 categories is easy to use, and facilitates the growth of the institutional repository and access to the materials through the Internet. »

    URL : http://scholarworks.wmich.edu/library_pubs/31/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 4 December 2013 à 12 h 58 min Permalien
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    Starting Scholarly Conversations: A Scholarly Communication Outreach Program :

    « As the scholarly communication system continues to evolve, academic librarians should take an active role in both developing their own knowledge and educating their campus communities about emergent topics. At Furman University, librarians developed an outreach program, aimed primarily at faculty, to increase awareness of current scholarly communication issues. Expert speakers were recruited to present throughout the year on open access, altmetrics, author’s rights, and other relevant topics. This program addressed a number of needs simultaneously—outreach to faculty; education for Furman librarians; and education for the greater library community—and affirmed the importance of providing opportunities to discuss these issues beyond the libraries. The program also further established Furman University Libraries’ role in educating and guiding its campus community through changes in scholarly communication models and practices. »

    URL : http://jlsc-pub.org/jlsc/vol2/iss1/2/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 27 November 2013 à 17 h 55 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , open repositories,   

    ETD Management and Publishing in the ProQuest System and the University Repository: A Comparative Analysis :

    « Introduction : This study compares the two most popular ETD management and publishing systems used in the American higher education community today: the commercial ProQuest Dissertation Publishing system and the university repository.
    Methods Characteristics of these systems are identified and categorized in order to determine the features, functions, and policies common to both, and those that uniquely characterize one or the other system. Performing such a head-to-head comparison provides valuable information and insights to decision makers responsible for managing or overhauling their university’s ETD program.
    Results : Comparison of characteristics shows the ProQuest system and the university repository both provide functional solutions for submitting, storing, disseminating, and archive ETDs using digital technology. Yet each system also has unique characteristics that distinguish it from the other.
    Discusssion and Conclusion : The authors conclude that there is no single ‘best’ system for ETD management overall. Rather, it is up to decision makers at each institution to choose an approach that best fits their university’s values, goals and needs. Finally, the authors point out the need for a single portal for ETDs that allows for search and discovery of these unique works of scholarship wherever the full text resides. Future investigation into possible solutions for such an ETD portal would be a boon not only to universities and ETD authors, but to the broader community of researchers, students, professionals and interested citizenry who could benefit from easier access to this this growing corpus of knowledge. »

    URL : http://jlsc-pub.org/jlsc/vol1/iss4/1/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 15 November 2013 à 22 h 59 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , open repositories,   

    2012 Census of Open Access Repositories in Germany: Turning Perceived Knowledge Into Sound Understanding :

    « Germany’s open access repository landscape is one of the largest in the world. It is shaped by institutional, subject and cross-institutional repositories serving different needs which range, for example, from a mere theses server to a repository integrated into an institutional information infrastructure. To date this landscape has never been fully surveyed. This article presents and interprets the results of a 2012 Census of Open Access Repositories in Germany. This Census covered crucial issues ranging from repository size and software, various value-added services, to general aspects of open access. The key findings of this survey shall help stakeholders in their decision making by identifying trends in the development of open access repositories in Germany. »

    URL : http://www.dlib.org/dlib/november13/vierkant/11vierkant.html

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 30 October 2013 à 10 h 27 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , open repositories   

    Open access clauses in publishers’ licenses: current state and lessons learned :

    « In 2012, the Open Access Agreements and Licenses Task Force was launched by COAR to monitor, evaluate and promote the implementation of effective open access agreements and licenses. The task force has members from the repository, licensing and OA communities who share an interest in promoting sustainable and effective practices for open access. In 2012/2013 the task force undertook an environmental scan of the licensing language for article deposit into repositories. This report presents the result of the review and some lessons learned from organizations that have been successful in implementing OA clauses in publisher licenses. »

    URL : http://www.coar-repositories.org/files/OA-Clauses-in-Publishers-Licenses.pdf

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 22 October 2013 à 10 h 48 min Permalien
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    Data Curation in the OpenAIRE Scholarly Communication Infrastructure :

    « OpenAIRE is the European Union initiative for an Open Access Infrastructure for Research in support of open scholarly communication and access to the research output of European funded projects and open access content from a network of institutional and disciplinary repositories. This article outlines the curation activities conducted in the OpenAIRE infrastructure, which employs a multi-level, multi-targeted approach: the publication and implementation of interoperability guidelines to assist in the local data curation processes, the data curation due to the integration of heterogeneous sources supporting different types of data, the inference of links to accomplish the publication research contextualization and data enrichment, and the end-user metadata curation that allows users to edit the attributes and provide links among the entities. »

    URL : http://dx.doi.org/10.3789/isqv25no3.2013.03

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 17 October 2013 à 17 h 59 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , open repositories,   

    Open-access repositories worldwide, 2005-2012: Past growth, current characteristics and future possibilities :

    « This paper reviews the worldwide growth of open-access (OA) repositories, December 2005 to December 2012, using data collected by the OpenDOAR project. It shows that initial repository development was focused on North America, Western Europe and Australasia, particularly the USA, UK, Germany and Australia. Soon after, Japan increased its repository numbers. Since 2010, other geographical areas and countries have seen repository growth, including East Asia (especially Taiwan), South America (especially Brazil) and Eastern Europe (especially Poland). During the whole period, countries such as France, Italy and Spain have maintained steady growth, whereas countries such as China and Russia have experienced relatively low levels of growth. Globally, repositories are predominantly institutional, multidisciplinary and English-language-based. They typically use open-source OAI-compliant repository software but remain immature in terms of explicit licensing arrangements. Whilst the size of repositories is difficult to assess accurately, the available data indicate that a small number of large repositories and a large number of small repositories make up the repository landscape. These trends and characteristics are analyzed using Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT) building on previous studies. IDT is shown to provide a useful explanatory framework for understanding repository adoption at various levels: global, national, organizational and individual. Major factors affecting both the initial development of repositories and their take up by users are identified, including IT infrastructure, language, cultural factors, policy initiatives, awareness-raising activity and usage mandates. It is argued that mandates in particular are likely to play a crucial role in determining future repository development. »

    URL : http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/76632/

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