Mots-clefs: open access policies Afficher/masquer les discussions | Raccourcis clavier

  • Hans Dillaerts le 4 December 2013 à 13 h 05 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , open access policies   

    Speaking As One: Supporting Open Access with Departmental Resolutions :

    « Library faculty at the City University of New York (CUNY) have engaged in promoting and advocating for open access publishing at each of our campuses as well as across the University. Inspired by the passing of a faculty senate resolution in support of the creation of an open access institutional repository and associated policies, many CUNY librarians felt the need to raise their level of commitment. In this article, the authors—four library faculty members and one faculty member from outside the library—share their experiences creating and approving open access policies in the library departments of four CUNY schools and promoting open access beyond the libraries. They offer practical advice and guidance for other librarians and faculty seeking to encourage the embrace of open access publishing in departments or other sub-institutional contexts. »

    URL : http://jlsc-pub.org/jlsc/vol2/iss1/3/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 29 October 2013 à 13 h 50 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , open access policies   

    MedOANet Guidelines for implementing open access policies for research performing and research funding organizations :

    « These Guidelines for implementing open access policies have been produced by the EC-funded project “Mediterranean Open Access Network” (www.medoanet.eu). They aim at coordinating policy-development in the six Mediterranean countries that participate in the project by providing concise and targeted guidelines for a harmonized approach towards policy development (France, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Turkey). They are directed to policy-makers and policy stakeholders specifically, to Research Performing Organizations and Research Funders.

    The guidelines take into consideration best practices and recent policy developments, in particular the European Commission’s Recommendation and Communication on access to and preservation of and dissemination of scientific information (2012) and the planning for Horizon 2020. They are also informed by relevant documents, policy papers, recommendations and guidelines, produced recently by organizations such as UNESCO, The League of European Research Universities, the European University Association, Science Europe, among others, as well as by surveys performed in the six countries by the project.

    More specifically the guidelines:
    • Present the main concepts and issues with respect to open access
    • Discuss the major steps that are necessary in the process of policy development
    • Present the important components of an institutional and funder policy
    • Present model policies for research performing and research funding organizations
    • Present best practices in policy development for research performing and research funding organizations »

    URL : http://medoanet.eu/sites/www.medoanet.eu/files/documents/MED2013_GUIDELine_dp_EN_ws.pdf

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 22 August 2013 à 17 h 00 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , open access policies   

    Open Access Strategies in the European Research Area :

    « This report presents an overview and analysis of strategies towards open access (OA) of peer-reviewed publications in the European Research Area (ERA), Brazil, Canada, Japan and the US from the year 2000 onwards. The analysis examines strategies that aim to foster OA (e.g. researcher and institutional incentives) and discusses how OA policies are monitored and enforced. The analysis is supported by findings from the literature on the global progression of OA since 2000, and comments on themes and debates that have emerged from the movement. »

    URL : http://www.science-metrix.com/pdf/SM_EC_OA_Policies.pdf

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 1 July 2013 à 18 h 20 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , open access policies, , ,   

    The Critical Role of Institutional Services in Open Access Advocacy :

    « This paper examines the development of the Open Access movement in scholarly communication, with particular attention to some of the rhetorical strategies and policy mechanisms used to promote it to scholars and scientists. Despite the majority of journal publishers’ acceptance of author self-archiving practices, and the minimal time commitment required by authors to successfully self-archive their work in disciplinary or institutional repositories, the majority of authors still by and large avoid participation. The paper reviews the strategies and arguments used for increasing author participation in open access, including the role of open access mandates. We recommend a service-oriented approach towards increasing participation in open access, rather than rhetoric that speculates on the benefits that open access will have on text/data mining innovation. In advocating for open access participation, we recommend focusing on its most universal and tangible purpose: increasing public open (gratis) access to the published results of publicly funded research. Researchers require strong institutional support to understand the copyright climate of open access self-archiving, user-friendly interfaces and useful metrics, such as repository usage statistics. We recommend that mandates and well-crafted and responsive author support services at universities will ultimately be required to ensure the growth of open access. We describe the mediated deposit service that was developed to support author self-archiving in Spectrum: Concordia University Research Repository. By comparing the number of deposits of non-thesis materials (e.g. articles and conference presentations) that were accomplished through the staff-mediated deposit service to the number of deposits that were author-initiated, we demonstrate the relative significance of this service to the growth of the repository. »

    URL : http://www.ijdc.net/index.php/ijdc/article/view/8.1.84

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 19 June 2013 à 17 h 46 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , open access policies, ,   

    Incentives, Integration, and Mediation: Sustainable Practices for Populating Repositories:

    « There is an active, thriving community of open access repositories worldwide and their visibility is rising as funding agencies and governments implement open access policies. Still, repositories must continue to adopt strategies that demonstrate their value to the wider research community. Therefore COAR has now published the report, “Incentives, Integration, and Mediation: Sustainable Practices for Population Repositories”. It profiles a variety of successful practices for populating repositories from around the world. Aim of thie report is to assist the global repository community in implementing sustainable methods for recruiting content. The profiles were gathered from organizations across the globe, and represent a mixture of approaches involving the introduction of incentives; integration of the repository with other institutional services; and/or mediation of the deposit process. The practices reflect a tradition of innovation and openness in the repository community, and are characterized by creative approaches to staffing, imaginative software developments, and adoption of novel policies. »

    URL : http://www.coar-repositories.org/activities/repository-content/sustainable-practices-for-populating-repositories-report/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 11 June 2013 à 17 h 32 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , open access policies,   

    Implementing Open Access in the United Kingdom :

    « Since July 2012, the UK has been undergoing an organized transition to open access. As of 01 April 2013, revised open access policies are coming into effect. Open access implementation requires new infrastructures for funding publishing. Universities as institutions increasingly will be central to managing article-processing charges, monitoring compliance and organizing deposit. This article reviews the implementation praxis between July 2012 and April 2013, including ongoing controversy and review, which has mainly focussed on embargo length. »

    URL : http://iospress.metapress.com/content/b449803863j2p826/?id=B449803863J2P826

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 11 June 2013 à 17 h 28 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , open access policies, , ,   

    The future of scholarly communication: US efforts to bring warring factions to common purpose in support of scholarship :

    « Key stakeholders in scholarly communication have been at odds over the purpose, mission and business models of publishing. This piece reviews developments in the United States but with a particular focus on efforts at reestablishing common purpose, such as (1) the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable created in June 2009 by the Chairman of Science and Technology Committee of the US House of Representatives; (2) the Task force of the Association of American Universities and Association of Research Libraries established in 2012 to focus on university presses, scholarly journals and institutional repositories; and (3) the Office of Science and Technology Policy Memorandum of February 22, 2013 on Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research. »

    URL : http://iospress.metapress.com/content/u727847272r65681/?id=U727847272R65681

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 24 April 2013 à 18 h 12 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , open access policies, ,   

    Metajournals. A federalist proposal for scholarly communication and data aggregation :

    « While the EU is building an open access infrastructure of archives (e.g. OpenAIRE) and it is trying to implement it in the Horizon 2020 program, the gap between the tools and the human beings – researchers, citizen scientists, students, ordinary people – is still wide. The necessity to dictate open access publishing as a mandate for the EU funded research – ten years after the BOAI – is an obvious symptom of it: there is a chasm between the net and the public use of reason. To escalate the advancement and the reuse of research, we should federate the multitude of already existing open access journals in federal open overlay journals that receive their contents from the member journals and boost it with their aggregation power and their semantic web tools. The article contains both the theoretical basis and the guidelines for a project whose goals are:
    1. making open access journals visible, highly cited and powerful, by federating them into wide disciplinary overlay journals;
    2. avoiding the traps of the “authors pay” open access business model, by exploiting one of the virtue of federalism: the federate journals can remain little and affordable, if they gain visibility from the power of the federal overlay journal aggregating them;
    3. enriching the overlay journals both through semantic annotation tools and by means of open platforms dedicated to host ex post peer review and experts comments;
    4. making the selection and evaluation processes and their resulting data as much as possible public and open, to avoid the pitfalls (e. g, the serials price crisis) experienced by the closed access publishing model. It is about time to free academic publishing from its expensive walled gardens and to put to test the tools that can help us to transform it in one open forest, with one hundred flowers – and one hundred trailblazers. »

    URL : http://eprints.rclis.org/19101/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 23 April 2013 à 12 h 25 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , , , open access policies, ,   

    Strategies for gaining and maintaining academic support for the institutional open access repository :

    « The impact of research can be measured by use or citation count. The more widely available that research outputs are; the more likely they are to be used, and the higher the impact. Making the author-manuscript version of research outputs freely available via the institutional repository greatly increases the availability of research outputs and can increase the impact.
    QUT ePrints, the open access institutional repository of research outputs at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia, was established in 2003 and is managed by the QUT Library. The repository now contains over 39,000 records. More than 21,000 of these records have full-text copies attached as result of continuous effort to maintain momentum and encourage academic engagement. The full-text deposit rate has continued to increase over time and, in 2012 (August, at the time of writing), 88% of the records for works published in 2012 provide access to a full-text copy.
    Achieving success has required a long term approach to collaboration, open access advocacy, repository promotion, support for the deposit process, and ongoing system development. This paper discusses the various approaches adopted by QUT Library, in collaboration with other areas of the University, to achieve success.
    Approaches include mainstreaming the repository via having it report to the University Research and Innovation Committee; regular provision of deposit rate data to faculties; championing key academic supporters; and holding promotional competitions and events such as during Open Access Week.
    Support and training is provided via regular deposit workshops with academics and faculty research support groups and via the provision of online self-help information. Recent system developments have included the integration of citation data (from Scopus and Web of Science) and the development of a statistical reporting system which incentivise engagement. »

    URL : http://eprints.qut.edu.au/59212/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 22 April 2013 à 18 h 10 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , , open access policies,   

    Scientific Output from Latin America and the Caribbean – Identification of the Main Institutions for Regional Open Access Integration Strategies :

    « Latin America is a region in which two thirds of the investment in research and development are funded by State resources. It can be foreseen that in the near future governments in the region will encourage and promote, or require by law or mandates, that scientific output from the region become visible and accessible in open access repositories and portals. This paper presents the results of a survey to identify the institutions of the region with the largest volume of scientific output and most exposure of their output on the Web, in order to help make those institutions visible to national, regional and international organizations involved in open access strategies and programs in Latin America and the Caribbean. The results show a leading position by universities from Brazil; a strong presence of universities from Mexico, Colombia, Argentina, Chile and Venezuela, and some presence of universities from Ecuador, Peru, Costa Rica, Cuba, Puerto Rico and Uruguay. »

    URL : http://eprints.rclis.org/19085/

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