Open data, [open] access: linking data sharing and article sharing in the Earth Sciences

Author : Samantha Teplitzky

Introduction

The norms of a research community influence practice, and norms of openness and sharing can be shaped to encourage researchers who share in one aspect of their research cycle to share in another.

Different sets of mandates have evolved to require that research data be made public, but not necessarily articles resulting from that collected data. In this paper, I ask to what extent publications in the Earth Sciences are more likely to be open access (in all of its definitions) when researchers open their data through the Pangaea repository.

Methods

Citations from Pangaea data sets were studied to determine the level of open access for each article.

Results

This study finds that the proportion of gold open access articles linked to the repository increased 25% from 2010 to 2015 and 75% of articles were available from multiple open sources.

Discussion

The context for increased preference for gold open access is considered and future work linking researchers’ decisions to open their work to the adoption of open access mandates is proposed.

URL : Open data, [open] access: linking data sharing and article sharing in the Earth Sciences

DOI : http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.2150

Linked Data is People: Building a Knowledge Graph to Reshape the Library Staff Directory

Authors : Jason A. Clark, Scott W. H. Young

One of our greatest library resources is people. Most libraries have staff directory information published on the web, yet most of this data is trapped in local silos, PDFs, or unstructured HTML markup.

With this in mind, the library informatics team at Montana State University (MSU) Library set a goal of remaking our people pages by connecting the local staff database to the Linked Open Data (LOD) cloud.

In pursuing linked data integration for library staff profiles, we have realized two primary use cases: improving the search engine optimization (SEO) for people pages and creating network graph visualizations.

In this article, we will focus on the code to build this library graph model as well as the linked data workflows and ontology expressions developed to support it. Existing linked data work has largely centered around machine-actionable data and improvements for bots or intelligent software agents.

Our work demonstrates that connecting your staff directory to the LOD cloud can reveal relationships among people in dynamic ways, thereby raising staff visibility and bringing an increased level of understanding and collaboration potential for one of our primary assets: the people that make the library happen.

URL : http://journal.code4lib.org/articles/12320

Decentralized provenance-aware publishing with nanopublications

Authors : Tobias Kuhn, Christine Chichester, Michael Krauthammer, Núria Queralt-Rosinach, Ruben Verborgh, George Giannakopoulos, Axel-Cyrille Ngonga Ngomo, Raffaele Viglianti, Michel Dumontier

Publication and archival of scientific results is still commonly considered the responsability of classical publishing companies. Classical forms of publishing, however, which center around printed narrative articles, no longer seem well-suited in the digital age.

In particular, there exist currently no efficient, reliable, and agreed-upon methods for publishing scientific datasets, which have become increasingly important for science. In this article, we propose to design scientific data publishing as a web-based bottom-up process, without top-down control of central authorities such as publishing companies.

Based on a novel combination of existing concepts and technologies, we present a server network to decentrally store and archive data in the form of nanopublications, an RDF-based format to represent scientific data.

We show how this approach allows researchers to publish, retrieve, verify, and recombine datasets of nanopublications in a reliable and trustworthy manner, and we argue that this architecture could be used as a low-level data publication layer to serve the Semantic Web in general.

Our evaluation of the current network shows that this system is efficient and reliable.

URL : Decentralized provenance-aware publishing with nanopublications

DOI : https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj-cs.78

The Paradox of Privacy: Revisiting a Core Library Value in an Age of Big Data and Linked Data

Protecting user privacy and confidentiality is fundamental to the ethics and practice of librarianship, and such protection constitutes one of eleven values in the American Library Association’s “Core Values of Librarianship” (2004).

This paper addresses the concerns of protecting privacy in the library as they relate to library users who are defining, exploring, and negotiating their sexual identities with the help of the library’s information, programming, and physical facilities.

In so doing, we enlist the aid of Garret Keizer, who, in Privacy (2012), articulates a fresh theory of the concept in light of American social life in the twenty-first century. Using Keizer’s theory, we examine these concerns within the context of the rise of big data systems and social media on the one hand, and linked data and new cataloging standards on the other.

In so doing, we suggest that linked data technologies, with their ability to lead searchers through self-directed, open inquiry, are superior to big data technologies in the navigation of the paradox between openness and secrecy.

In this way they offer a greater potential to support the needs of queer library users: lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, or questioning (LGBTQ).

URL : http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/library_trends/v064/64.3.campbell.html

Linking Libraries to the Web: Linked Data and the Future of the Bibliographic Record

« The ideas behind Linked Data and the Semantic Web have recently gained ground and shown the potential to redefine the world of the web. Linked Data could conceivably create a huge database out of the Internet linked by relationships understandable by both humans and machines. The benefits of Linked Data to libraries and their users are potentially great, but so are the many challenges to its implementation. The BIBFRAME Initiative provides the possible framework that will link library resources with the web, bringing them out of their information silos and making them accessible to all users. »

URL : http://microblogging.infodocs.eu/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/gonzales2014.pdf

DOI : 10.6017/ital.v33i4.5631

Le virage Linked Open Data en bibliothèque : étude des pratiques, mise en œuvre, compétences des professionnels

Les Linked Open Data (LOD) mettent peu à peu en évidence des enjeux considérables pour les professionnels de l’information et les bibliothèques. Cet article fait un tour d’horizon de la question en abordant plusieurs aspects. Après avoir introduit les concepts-clés de cette thématique, il s’attache à déterminer l’utilité des LOD en bibliothèque en présentant quelques applications innovantes. Prérequis pour la création de telles applications, la conversion des données en LOD est décrite sous la forme d’un procédé généralisable.

L’article change ensuite de perspective et se penche sur le professionnel de l’information, en identifiant les compétences les plus pertinentes à acquérir pour faire face à ces évolutions. Enfin, il décrit la réalisation concrète d’une formation à distance sur les LOD, accessible à tous sur le web.

URL : http://www.ressi.ch/num15/article_100

Publishing the British National Bibliography as Linked Open Data

« This paper describes the development of a linked data instance of the British National Bibliography (BNB) by the British Library. The focus is on the development of an RDF (Resource Description Framework) data model and the technical process to convert MARC 21 Bibliographic Data to Linked Data using existing resources. BNB was launched as linked open data in 2011 on a Talis platform. In 2013 it was migrated to a new platform, hosted by TSO. The paper discusses issues arising from the development, implementation and running of a linked data service. It also looks ahead to plans for future developments »

URL : Publishing the British National Bibliography as Linked Open Data

Alternative URL : http://www.bl.uk/bibliographic/pdfs/publishing_bnb_as_lod.pdf