Calenge par Bertrand, parcours de lecture dans le Carnet d’un bibliothécaire : Du blog au book

Auteur/Author : Jérôme pouchol

Nous sommes tous redevables à Bertrand Calenge, bibliothécaire de renom, théoricien et praticien des bibliothèques, disparu en 2016.

Un collectif de bibliothécaires fait revivre cet auteur, en proposant un parcours de lecture à travers son blog Carnet de notes.

Ces parcours thématiques et transversaux recontextualisent les billets selon les principaux sujets traités par l’auteur – collections, médiation, évaluation, métier, numérique, etc. – autant dire toutes les questions vives des bibliothèques.

Ce livre expérimente une mise en book du blog d’un professionnel, pour nous inviter, comme l’écrit Martine Poulain dans sa préface, « à penser, échanger, proposer ».

URL : Calenge par Bertrand, parcours de lecture dans le Carnet d’un bibliothécaire : Du blog au book

Alternative location : http://www.enssib.fr/presses/catalogue/calenge-par-bertrand-parcours-de-lecture-dans-le-carnet-dun-bibliothecaire

Library-Mediated Deposit: A Gift to Researchers or a Curse on Open Access? Reflections from the Case of Surrey

Authors : Christine Antiope Daoutis, Maria de Montserrat Rodriguez-Marquez

The University of Surrey was one of the first universities to set up an open access repository. The Library was the natural stakeholder to lead this project. Over the years, the service has been influenced by external and internal factors, and consequently the Library’s role in developing the OA agenda has changed.

Here, we present the development and implementation of a fully mediated open access service at Surrey. The mediated workflow was introduced following an operational review, to ensure higher compliance and engagement from researchers.

The size and responsibilities of the open access team in the Library increased to comply with internal and external policies and to implement the fully mediated workflow. As a result, there has been a growth in deposit rates and overall compliance.

We discuss the benefits and shortcomings of Library mediation; its effects on the relationship between the Library, senior management and researchers, and the increasing necessity for the Library to lead towards a culture of openness beyond policy compliance.

URL : Library-Mediated Deposit: A Gift to Researchers or a Curse on Open Access? Reflections from the Case of Surrey

Alternative location : http://www.mdpi.com/2304-6775/6/2/20

Opening the Heart of Science: A Review of the Changing Roles of Research Libraries

Author : Jorge Revez

In a world of information overload and data deluge, is opening science a research library’s duty? Or is the openness of science deeply changing libraries, ultimately converting them into something else?

The purpose of the review is to highlight the challenging issues stemming from the relationship between research and libraries. A broad literature analysis was performed focused on the intersection of three different perspectives: (1) the future of research libraries, (2) the emerging new roles, and (3) the ongoing openness of science.

Libraries are still at the heart of science but challenged by several stakeholders within the complexity of present science production and communication. Research support services, research data management, or research information management are emerging roles, among others, sustaining an open path where libraries thrive to be more collaborative while looking forward to establishing new partnerships.

URL : Opening the Heart of Science: A Review of the Changing Roles of Research Libraries

DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/publications6010009

Understanding Factors that Encourage Research Productivity for Academic Librarians

Authors : Kristin Hoffmann, Selinda Berg, Denise Koufogiannakis

Objective

This project identifies the factors that contribute to the success of librarians as active researchers. Research success is generally aligned with productivity and output, and the authors are therefore interested in understanding the factors that encourage research productivity. This fills a gap in the literature on librarians as researchers, which has tended to focus on barriers rather than enablers.

Methods

For this quantitative study, we distributed an online survey to 1,653 potential participants across Canada and received 453 usable responses for a 27% response rate. The survey asked participants to report their research outputs and to answer questions that addressed three categories of factors: Individual Attributes, Peers and Community, and Institutional Structures and Supports.

We then statistically analyzed participant responses in order to identify relationships between the research output variables (weighted output score and number of peer-reviewed articles) and the three categories, the factors within those categories, and the constituent components.

Results

Participants’ research output consisted largely of presentations, non-peer-reviewed articles, peer-reviewed articles, and posters. All three categories of factors were significantly related to research output, both for a calculated weighted output score and for number of peer-reviewed articles.

All of the factors identified within those categories were also significant when tested against weighted output score, but Intrinsic Motivations was not a significant factor when tested against number of peer-reviewed articles.

Several components of factors were also not significant for number of peer-reviewed articles. Age was the only significant component of Demographics. Three components of Education and Experience were significant: whether participants had received research training after completing their MLIS, whether they were working on an advanced degree, and the institution where they had obtained their MLIS.

Conclusions

Research productivity is significantly impacted by all three categories: Individual Attributes, Peers and Community, and Institutional Structures and Supports. Fostering an environment that focuses on all of these areas will be most likely to promote research output for librarians. At the same time, this study’s findings point to particular aspects that warrant further investigation, such as the nature and effect of institutional support and librarians’ motivations for doing research.

URL : Understanding Factors that Encourage Research Productivity for Academic Librarians

DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.18438/B8G66F

 

 

Valoriser les ressources numériques alternatives dans les bibliothèques publiques : un vecteur d’opportunités pour le développement des biens communs

Auteur/Author : Hans Dillaerts

Les ressources numériques alternatives peuvent être définies comme des ressources relevant du domaine public ou des ressources numériques diffusées sous la forme d’une licence libre. La place qu’occupent ces ressources dans les bibliothèques publiques est encore marginale.

Force est de constater que les politiques documentaires des bibliothèques publiques s’articulent prioritairement autour de l’offre commerciale portée par les éditeurs. Alors qu’il paraît évident que l’intégration et la valorisation de ces ressources libres au cœur des politiques documentaires permettraient non seulement aux bibliothèques de proposer une offre plus riche et plus diversifiée, mais aussi de valoriser la richesse littéraire, culturelle et artistique qui se développe sur le Web en dehors de la sphère marchande.

Quelles sont ces ressources numériques alternatives ? Comment opérer et construire une offre documentaire complémentaire des ressources physiques ? Quels enjeux pour les bibliothèques, le métier et les missions des bibliothécaires?

URL : https://archivesic.ccsd.cnrs.fr/sic_01561437

 

Changing Roles of Librarians and Library Technicians

What significant changes are librarians and library technicians experiencing in their roles? A survey put forward across Canada to librarians and library technicians addressing this question was conducted in February 2014. Eight hundred eighty-two responses were obtained from librarians, defined as MLIS graduates, and library technicians, defined as graduates from a two-year library diploma program.

Respondents needed to have been employed in the last two years in these roles and students of either an MLIS or LIT program were also welcome to participate.

The results suggest that both librarians and library technicians perceive their roles as growing in scope and complexity and that the lines of responsibility are blurring. A majority of respondents indicated that they perceive a change in their roles in the past five years and commented on what the perceived changes were.

Librarian and library technician roles may be shifting away from what may be viewed as traditional or clearly defined responsibilities and both librarians and library technicians may be taking on new tasks as well as experiencing task overlap.All library staff will need to be fluid, adaptable, and open to change. Library school curricula and workplace training need to incorporate the development of these competencies.

URL : Changing Roles of Librarians and Library Technicians

Alternative location : https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/article/view/3333

Changing Role of Academic Librarians in Open Access Environment

Application of information and communication technology is supporting various ways of scholarly communication. The transition from print to electronic and paid resources to open access resources has a great impact on information society and resulted open access movement. This paper enumerates various declarations on open access and discusses the impact of open access on libraries particularly on the role of academic librarians. On the basis of existing literature, an attempt has been made in this paper to understand transforming role of academic librarians and suggest new responsibilities in open access environment.

URL : Changing Role of Academic Librarians in Open Access Environment

Alternative location : http://irjlis.com/changing-role-of-academic-librarians-in-open-access-environment/