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  • Hans Dillaerts le 6 April 2011 à 16 h 59 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: HSS, ,   

    Reinventing Research? Information Practices in the Humanities :

    This report is the second in a series of three commissioned by the Research Information Network (RIN), each looking at information practices in a specific discipline (life sciences, humanities and physical sciences). The aim is to understand how researchers within a range of disciplines find and use information, and in particular how that has changed with the introduction of new technologies.

    Humanities scholars are often perceived in very traditional terms: spending a lot of time working on their own and collaborating only informally through highly-dispersed networks. Unlike most scientists, they have no long tradition of working in formal, close-knit and collaborative research groups. Humanities scholars have also sometimes been presented as ‘depth’ rather than ‘breadth’ researchers, preferring to spend significant amounts of time with a few items, rather than working across a broader frame. In terms of information sources, text and images held in archives and libraries tend to dominate, with less of an association with new web-based technologies (although this is changing with the increasing visibility of digital humanities).

    This report suggests that such perceptions may be out of date. In each of our case studies we found researchers working with new tools and technologies, in increasingly collaborative environments, and both producing and using information resources in diverse ways. There is a richness and variety within humanities information practices which must be recognised and understood if we are to provide the right kind of support for researchers.

    URL : http://www.rin.ac.uk/system/files/attachments/Humanities_Case_Studies_for_screen.pdf

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 15 March 2011 à 17 h 34 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: HSS, information needs, , , ,   

    Discovering the Information Needs of Humanists When Planning an Institutional Repository :

    « Through in-person interviews with humanities faculty members, this study examines what information needs are expressed by humanities scholars that an institutional repository (IR) can address. It also asks what concerns humanists have about IRs, and whether there is a repository model other than an institutional one that better suits how they work. Humanists make relatively low use of existing IRs, but this research indicates that an institutional repository can offer services to humanities faculty that are desired by them, especially the digitization, online storage, curation, and sharing of their research materials and publications. If presented in terms that make sense to humanities faculty, and designed consciously with their needs and concerns in mind, an IR can be of real benefit to their teaching, scholarship, collaborations, and publishing. »

    URL : http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march11/seaman/03seaman.html

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 22 February 2011 à 23 h 18 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: academic, , , HSS, , , , ,   

    Open Access monographic publishing in the humanities :

    « In recent years, it has become widely recognized that in the case of monographs, the traditional business model for books is losing its sustainability. Academic publishers have been forced to become more selective in the books they publish, and authors, in particular young researchers and first time authors, have found it harder to find a press willing to publish their work. In response to the economic restraints of printed monographs, many publishers and academic institutes, in particular research libraries, have started to experiment with digital and Open Access publication of monographs.

    OAPEN is the first international project to develop an Open Access model for publishers and stakeholders in scholarly communication. OAPEN stands for Open Access Publishing in European Networks. It is a 30 month project co-funded by the European Union, to develop and implement an Open Access (OA) publication model for peer reviewed academic books in the Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS). »

    URL : http://iospress.metapress.com/content/l6wg61l0mg6426w8/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 24 November 2010 à 11 h 40 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: HSS, ,   

    Scaling Vectors: Thoughts on the Future of Scholarly Communication :

    « This essay proposes that bold new forms of experimentation and bookishness are necessary if we are to advance (and perhaps save) scholarly publishing in the humanities. Possible issues facing presses are considered through consideration of two examples in scholarly publishing that involve the author. The first example, the experimental journal Vectors, highlights the advantages and limits of certain types of multimodal scholarly communication for the humanities. The second example, the new Alliance for Networking Visual Culture, points toward new methods of workflow and publishing that link archives, scholars, and presses. The essay ends with a list of key questions that presses will need to address as various stakeholders collectively expand what we understand humanities publishing to be. »

    URL : http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=jep;view=text;rgn=main;idno=3336451.0013.208

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 21 October 2010 à 21 h 01 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: HSS, library publishing, , ,   

    From Service Providers to Content Producers: New Opportunities For Libraries in Collaborative Open Access Book Publishing :

    « Several libraries have become active partners in Open Access publishing of books in the Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS). Not only have libraries started up their own presses, they are also collaborating with existing presses or forming alliances with other institutions on campus such as scholarly communication offices, ICT departments, and academic research centers. By combining institutional strengths and enabling the sharing of resources across institutions, these collaborations offer synergies and efficiencies in the scholarly book publishing business. This paper examines this new function taken on by libraries. Using research conducted by the European project “Open Access Publishing in European Networks” (OAPEN) on OA publishing models and business models for books, we look at libraries’ motives and challenges and explore how their new roles enable them to serve their customers in the most effective way. By combining digital repositories with scholarly publishing, libraries can facilitate and support HSS book publishing and can help sustain the scholarly monograph in the transition towards digital formats and an Open Access future. »

    URL : http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a928309305~frm=titlelink

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 6 October 2010 à 19 h 13 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: HSS, , , ,   

    The OAPEN library and publication platform is online :

    « OAPEN (Open Access Publishing in European Networks) is a collaborative initiative to develop and implement a sustainable Open Access publication model for academic books in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The OAPEN Library aims to improve the visibility and usability of high quality academic research by aggregating peer reviewed Open Access publications from across Europe. « 

    URL : http://www.oapen.org/xtf/home?brand=oapen

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 2 August 2010 à 18 h 32 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: HSS, , ,   

    Report on Best Practices and Recommendations :
    « This report is the third in a series of studies conducted by OAPEN on digital monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The first report focused on the needs of users and stakeholders, and the second looked at the existing (and developing) publishing and business models. The aim of this report is to provide the different players—publishers, funders, librarians, readers, scholars and politicians—with a set of recommendations concerning the strategic issues in Open Access book publishing. For those already in the process of developing an Open Access policy, this report maps out the issues and decisions they may confront. »
    URL : http://www.oapen.org/images/D316_OAPEN_Best_practice_public_report.pdf

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 31 May 2010 à 17 h 39 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , HSS, , ,   

    Sciences et société en interaction sur Internet. Éléments pour une histoire de l’édition électronique en sciences humaines et sociales :
    Dans l’histoire des rapports complexes qu’entretiennent sciences et société, le développement des réseaux numériques constitue un moment stratégique, que ce soit au niveau de leur développement technique, ou des modifications que ce développement produit sur les formes de la communication scientifique. Le cas particulier des sciences humaines et sociales met bien en évidence le rôle de médiation que les TIC jouent dans les relations entre sciences et société.
    URL : http://archivesic.ccsd.cnrs.fr/sic_00439828/en/

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