Assessment of and Response to Data Needs of Clinical and Translational Science Researchers and Beyond

Objective and Setting

As universities and libraries grapple with data management and “big data,” the need for data management solutions across disciplines is particularly relevant in clinical and translational science (CTS) research, which is designed to traverse disciplinary and institutional boundaries.

At the University of Florida Health Science Center Library, a team of librarians undertook an assessment of the research data management needs of CTS researchers, including an online assessment and follow-up one-on-one interviews.

Design and Methods

The 20-question online assessment was distributed to all investigators affiliated with UF’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and 59 investigators responded. Follow-up in-depth interviews were conducted with nine faculty and staff members.

Results

Results indicate that UF’s CTS researchers have diverse data management needs that are often specific to their discipline or current research project and span the data lifecycle. A common theme in responses was the need for consistent data management training, particularly for graduate students; this led to localized training within the Health Science Center and CTSI, as well as campus-wide training.

Another campus-wide outcome was the creation of an action-oriented Data Management/Curation Task Force, led by the libraries and with participation from Research Computing and the Office of Research.

Conclusions

Initiating conversations with affected stakeholders and campus leadership about best practices in data management and implications for institutional policy shows the library’s proactive leadership and furthers our goal to provide concrete guidance to our users in this area.

URL : Assessment of and Response to Data Needs of Clinical and Translational Science Researchers and Beyond

Alternative location : http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/jeslib/vol5/iss1/2/

Les pratiques de recherche documentaire, de publication et de diffusion scientifique des productions de la recherche à l’Université Paris-Sud : questionnaire à destination des chercheurs, enseignants-chercheurs et doctorants

Il s’agit de l’analyse détaillée des réponses à une enquête en ligne à destination des chercheurs, enseignants-chercheurs et doctorants de l’université Paris-Sud sur leurs pratiques de recherche documentaire, de publication et d’archivage de leurs productions scientifiques.

Cette enquête a été réalisée du 3 février au 7 avril 2015 dans le cadre du projet du Schéma Directeur numérique de l’université Paris-Sud de réservoir des productions de la recherche à des fins d’archivage systématique, de diffusion et de valorisation.

URL : Les pratiques de recherche documentaire, de publication et de diffusion scientifique des productions de la recherche à l’Université Paris-Sud

Alternative location : http://archivesic.ccsd.cnrs.fr/hal-01292693v1

De l’usage des revues juridiques dématérialisées : A propos des interactions entre TIC et recherche juridique

Si la réussite d’une revue juridique se traduit tant par la diversité des thématiques abordées et de ses auteurs que par l’actualité des propos, force est de reconnaître que sa longévité est un critère tout aussi pertinent. Une existence qui doit essentiellement sa pérennité à l’investissement originel de ses créateurs et continu de ses contributeurs.

Il faut avouer que le support dématérialisé évince toute contrainte financière substantielle pour une revue et que l’accès libre aux articles (le fameux open-access) facilite grandement la diffusion des travaux de recherche. La revue Neptunus du Centre de Droit Maritime et Océanique de l’Université de Nantes a ainsi été précurseur dans la diffusion des idées sans contrainte matérielle ou financière.

D’ailleurs, quelques années après sa création en 1994, des prises de position et des appels en ce sens, hors de nos frontières nationales, initient une réflexion, désormais ancrée dans toutes les politiques d’innovation et de recherche…

URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01288752

Current state of open access to journal publications from the University of Zagreb School of Medicine

AIMS

To identify the share of open access (OA) papers in the total number of journal publications authored by the members of the University of Zagreb School of Medicine (UZSM) in 2014.

METHODS

Bibliographic data on 543 UZSM papers published in 2014 were collected using PubMed advanced search strategies and manual data collection methods. The items that had « free full text » icons were considered as gold OA papers.

Their OA availability was checked using the provided link to full-text. The rest of the UZSM papers were analyzed for potential green OA through self-archiving in institutional repository. Papers published by Croatian journals were particularly analyzed.

RESULTS

Full texts of approximately 65% of all UZSM papers were freely available. Most of them were published in gold OA journals (55% of all UZSM papers or 85% of all UZSM OA papers). In the UZSM repository, there were additional 52 freely available authors’ manuscripts from subscription-based journals (10% of all UZSM papers or 15% of all UZSM OA papers).

CONCLUSION

The overall proportion of OA in our study is higher than in similar studies, but only half of gold OA papers are accessible via PubMed directly. The results of our study indicate that increased quality of metadata and linking of the bibliographic records to full texts could assure better visibility. Moreover, only a quarter of papers from subscription-based journals that allow self-archiving are deposited in the UZSM repository.

We believe that UZSM should consider mandating all faculty members to deposit their publications in UZSM OA repository to increase visibility and improve access to its scientific output.

URL : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26935617

Researchers’ Adoption of an Institutional Central Fund for Open-Access Article-Processing Charges : A Case Study Using Innovation Diffusion Theory

This article analyzes researchers’ adoption of an institutional central fund (or faculty publication fund) for open-access (OA) article-processing charges (APCs) to contribute to a wider understanding of take-up of OA journal publishing (“Gold” OA). Quantitative data, recording central fund usage at the University of Nottingham from 2006 to 2014, are analyzed alongside qualitative data from institutional documentation.

The importance of the settings of U.K. national policy developments and international OA adoption trends are considered. Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT) is used as an explanatory framework. It is shown that use of the central fund grew during the period from covering less than 1% of the University’s outputs to more than 12%. Health and Life Sciences disciplines made greatest use of the fund.

Although highly variable, average APC prices rose during the period, with fully OA publishers setting lower average APCs. APCs were paid largely from internal funds, but external funding became increasingly important. Key factors in adoption are identified to be increasing awareness and changing perceptions of OA, communication, disciplinary differences, and adoption mandates.

The study provides a detailed longitudinal analysis of one of the earliest central funds to be established globally with a theoretically informed explanatory model to inform future work on managing central funds and developing institutional and national OA policies.

URL : Researchers’ Adoption of an Institutional Central Fund for Open-Access Article-Processing Charges

DOI: 10.1177/2158244015625447

Managing open access with EPrints software: a case study

Recent additional open access (OA) requirements for publications by authors at UK higher education institutions require amendments to support mechanisms. These additional requirements arose primarily from the Research Councils UK Open Access Policy, applicable from April 2013, and the new OA policy for Research Excellence Framework  eligibility published in March 2014 and applicable from April 2016.

Further provision also had to be made for compliance with the UK Charities Open Access Fund, the European Union, other funder policies, and internal reporting requirements.

In response, the University of Glasgow has enhanced its OA processes and systems. This case study charts our journey towards managing OA via our EPrints repository. The aim was to consolidate and manage OA information in one central place to increase efficiency of recording, tracking and reporting. We are delighted that considerable time savings and reduction in errors have been achieved by dispensing with spreadsheets to record decisions about OA.

URL : Managing open access with EPrints software: a case study

DOI : http://doi.org/10.1629/uksg.277

How do scientists perceive the current publication culture? A qualitative focus group interview study among Dutch biomedical researchers

Design

Qualitative focus group interview study.

Setting

Four university medical centres in the Netherlands.

Participants

Three randomly selected groups of biomedical scientists (PhD, postdoctoral staff members and full professors).

Main outcome measures

Main themes for discussion were selected by participants.

Results

Frequently perceived detrimental effects of contemporary publication culture were the strong focus on citation measures (like the Journal Impact Factor and the H-index), gift and ghost authorships and the order of authors, the peer review process, competition, the funding system and publication bias. These themes were generally associated with detrimental and undesirable effects on publication practices and on the validity of reported results.

Furthermore, senior scientists tended to display a more cynical perception of the publication culture than their junior colleagues. However, even among the PhD students and the postdoctoral fellows, the sentiment was quite negative. Positive perceptions of specific features of contemporary scientific and publication culture were rare.

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that the current publication culture leads to negative sentiments, counterproductive stress levels and, most importantly, to questionable research practices among junior and senior biomedical scientists.

URL : How do scientists perceive the current publication culture? A qualitative focus group interview study among Dutch biomedical researchers

Alternative location : http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/6/2/e008681.full