Pour une approche communicationnelle des politiques de protection des données personnelles

Auteur/Author : Julien Rossi

Les dispositifs numériques contribuent à la traçabilité des individus et facilitent l’exploitation de leurs traces. Les politiques de protection des données personnelles visent dans ce contexte à protéger la vie privée informationnelle des individus. Mais une analyse détaillée des différents énoncés juridiques performatifs (lois, jurisprudence, rapports, mais aussi discours d’acteurs) montre que les termes employés dans ceux-ci connaissent des acceptions diverses, à commencer par le terme même de « donnée à caractère personnel ».

Une cartographie des controverses définitionnelles autour de ce terme, inspirée par les approches cognitives ou communicationnelles de l’action publique, combinée à l’analyse sémiologique des documents et discours d’acteurs de terrain, permet de déceler le sens implicite des différentes acceptions en présence, et la façon dont s’est constitué un référentiel idéologique sectoriel favorable à la vie privée qui a dû cependant maintenir son articulation avec un référentiel global favorable à l’exploitation des traces.

URL : https://www.sfsic.org/index.php/services-300085/bibliotheque/doctorales-2017/912-jrossidoctorales17/file

The Paradox of Privacy: Revisiting a Core Library Value in an Age of Big Data and Linked Data

Protecting user privacy and confidentiality is fundamental to the ethics and practice of librarianship, and such protection constitutes one of eleven values in the American Library Association’s “Core Values of Librarianship” (2004).

This paper addresses the concerns of protecting privacy in the library as they relate to library users who are defining, exploring, and negotiating their sexual identities with the help of the library’s information, programming, and physical facilities.

In so doing, we enlist the aid of Garret Keizer, who, in Privacy (2012), articulates a fresh theory of the concept in light of American social life in the twenty-first century. Using Keizer’s theory, we examine these concerns within the context of the rise of big data systems and social media on the one hand, and linked data and new cataloging standards on the other.

In so doing, we suggest that linked data technologies, with their ability to lead searchers through self-directed, open inquiry, are superior to big data technologies in the navigation of the paradox between openness and secrecy.

In this way they offer a greater potential to support the needs of queer library users: lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, or questioning (LGBTQ).

URL : http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/library_trends/v064/64.3.campbell.html

Privacy and Intellectual Property on the Web: A Model for LIIs Open Source Publications

We are proposing an Open Access model for Legal Information Institutes (LIIs) publications in three steps: Accredited Public Archival (APA), Comment-Open Publication (COP) and Peer-Reviewed Publication (PRP).

This raises some ethical and legal issues on privacy and intellectual property which cannot be ignored. We would like to foster dialogue and discussion as the unique means to create an interactive framework among research communities, IILs and users.

URL : http://www.hklii.hk/conference/paper/2B4.pdf

Tragedy of the Data Commons

Accurate data is vital to enlightened research and policymaking, particularly publicly available data that are redacted to protect the identity of individuals.

Legal academics, however, are campaigning against data anonymization as a means to protect privacy, contending that wealth of information available on the Internet enables malfeasors to reverse-engineer the data and identify individuals within them.

Privacy scholars advocate for new legal restrictions on the collection and dissemination of research data. This Article challenges the dominant wisdom, arguing that properly de-identified data is not only safe, but of extraordinary social utility.

It makes three core claims. First, legal scholars have misinterpreted the relevant literature from computer science and statistics, and thus have significantly overstated the futility of anonymizing data. Second, the available evidence demonstrates that the risks from anonymized data are theoretical – they rarely, if ever, materialize. Finally, anonymized data is crucial to beneficial social research, and constitutes a public resource – a commons – under threat of depletion.

The Article concludes with a radical proposal: since current privacy policies overtax valuable research without reducing any realistic risks, law should provide a safe harbor for the dissemination of research data.”

URL : http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1789749

Trust and privacy in the future internet…

Trust and privacy in the future internet—a research perspective :
With the proliferation of networked electronic communication came daunting capabilities to collect, process, combine and store data, resulting in hitherto unseen transformational pressure on the concepts of trust, security and privacy as we know them. The Future Internet will bring about a world where real life will integrate physical and digital life. Technology development for data linking and mining, together with unseen data collection, will lead to unwarranted access to personal data, and hence, privacy intrusion. Trust and identity lie at the basis of many human interactions and transactions, and societies have developed legitimate concern for privacy being essential for freedom and creativity. The burgeoning development of the Information Society, particularly during the past fifteen years, transcended the societal readiness to respond to the transformational change evoked by ICT. We have reached the eleventh hour for the preservation of trust and privacy as elements that can be transposed into our digital future. Europe has been at the forefront in recognizing the importance of privacy protection in relation to digital data, witness the advanced European legislation in this domain. The European Commission recognizes that appropriate measures need to combine technology development with legal means, user awareness and tools supporting data controllers to comply with law in an accountable and transparent way, and that empower users with a controlling stake in managing their personal data. Activities are underway at many levels. European RTD programmes play their role in supporting research in trustworthy ICT, privacy enhancing technologies, privacy-by-design in service layers as well as in networks, enabling technologies such as cryptography, and in generalized frameworks for trust and privacy-protective identity management.
URL : http://www.springerlink.com/content/e265088034l198x3/