Better Sharing Through Licenses? Measuring the Influence of Creative Commons Licenses on the Usage of Open Access Monographs

« Introduction :  Open Access and licenses are closely intertwined. Both Creative Commons (CC) and Open Access seek to restore the balance between the owners of creative works and prospective users. Apart from the legal issues around CC licenses, we could look at role of intermediaries whose work is enabled through CC licenses. Does licensing documents under Creative Commons increase access and reuse in a direct way, or is access and reuse amplified by intermediaries?

OAPEN Library and DOAB The OAPEN Library contains books available under both open licenses, for example Creative Commons, as well as books that are published under terms that only allow for personal use. The Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) functions as an intermediary, offering aggregation services exclusively focused on books with an open license.

Methods: Downloads are used as a proxy for the use of books in the OAPEN Library. The data set that this paper analyses data that was captured over a period of 33 months. During this time, 1734 different books were made available through the OAPEN Library: 855 books under a Creative Commons license and 879 books under a more restrictive regime. The influence of open licenses, aggregation in DOAB, and subject and language are evaluated.

Results :  Once the effects of subject and language are taken into account, there is no evidence that making books available under open licenses results in more downloads than making books available under licenses that only allow for personal use. Yet, additional aggregation in the DOAB has a large positive effect on the number of times a book is downloaded.

Conclusion : The application of open licenses to books does not, on its own, lead to more downloads. However, open licenses pave the way for intermediaries to offer new discovery and aggregation services. These services play an important role by amplifying the impacts of open access licensing in the case of scholarly books. »

URL : Better Sharing Through Licenses? Measuring the Influence of Creative Commons Licenses on the Usage of Open Access Monographs

DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1187

Implementation of open content licenses …

Implementation of open content licenses :

« Open access is free of charge and free of most usage restrictions online access to research literature. Open content licenses or some explicit statement attached to the article when it is published in an open access journal or deposited in an open access repository help to refer to a specific type of libre open access. These licenses / statements make it clear to the reusers what they are permitted to do with published and deposited articles (including data). An organization’s or journal’s licensing policy (including policy on re-use and redistribution) shall be clearly stated and visible on the web site.

The survey attempted to gather information from a broad spectrum of research institutions in developing and transition countries in order to get a better understanding of the current state of the implementation of open content licenses. We looked at the web sites of 2,489 open access journals and 357 open access repositories from EIFL network countries1. And this report highlights the best practices in using open content licenses by open access journals and open access repositories in developing and transition countries […]

The first version of the report was released on July 7, 2010 with request for comments and a call for more case studies on using open content licenses by open access journals and open access repositories in developing and transition countries. The second revised version of the report with more case studies from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Poland (provided by Bożena Bednarek-Michalska, Torun University Library), South Africa, Ukraine and Latin America (CLASCO case study provided by Dr. Dominique Babini) was released on September 7, 2010.

This is the third version with updated case studies from China, Nigeria, Poland, Russia, South Africa and Ukraine and new case studies from Ghana, Lithuania, Thailand, Kenya and Slovenia.

The report was produced in the frames of EIFL-OA advocacy program supported by Open Society Institute and the Wellcome Trust. »

URL : http://www.eifl.net/news/implementation-open-content-licenses

Report on the implementation of open con…

Report on the implementation of open content licenses in developing and transition countries :
« The survey attempted to gather information from a broad spectrum of research institutions in developing and transition countries in order to get a better understanding of the current state of the implementation of open content licenses. Open content licenses or some explicit statement attached to the article when it is published in an open access journal or deposited in an open access repository help to refer to a specific type of libre open access. These licenses / statements make it clear to the reusers what they are permitted to do with published and deposited articles (including data). An organization’s or journal’s licensing policy (including policy on re-use and redistribution) shall be clearly stated and visible on the web site. We looked at the web sites of 2,041 open access journals and 218 open access repositories from eIFL network countries. And this report highlights the best practices in using open content licenses by open access journals and open access repositories in developing and transition countries. The report was produced in the framework of the EIFL-OA advocacy programme supported by Open Society Institute and the Wellcome Trust. »
URL : http://www.eifl.net/cps/sections/services/eifl-oa/docs/report-on-implementation/downloadFile/file/Report_on_open_content_licenses_June.pdf?nocache=1278496158.76