Unveiling Scholarly Communities over Knowledge Graphs

Authors : Sahar Vahdati, Guillermo Palma, Rahul Jyoti Nath, Christoph Lange, Sören Auer, Maria-Esther Vidal

Knowledge graphs represent the meaning of properties of real-world entities and relationships among them in a natural way. Exploiting semantics encoded in knowledge graphs enables the implementation of knowledge-driven tasks such as semantic retrieval, query processing, and question answering, as well as solutions to knowledge discovery tasks including pattern discovery and link prediction.

In this paper, we tackle the problem of knowledge discovery in scholarly knowledge graphs, i.e., graphs that integrate scholarly data, and present Korona, a knowledge-driven framework able to unveil scholarly communities for the prediction of scholarly networks.

Korona implements a graph partition approach and relies on semantic similarity measures to determine relatedness between scholarly entities. As a proof of concept, we built a scholarly knowledge graph with data from researchers, conferences, and papers of the Semantic Web area, and apply Korona to uncover co-authorship networks.

Results observed from our empirical evaluation suggest that exploiting semantics in scholarly knowledge graphs enables the identification of previously unknown relations between researchers.

By extending the ontology, these observations can be generalized to other scholarly entities, e.g., articles or institutions, for the prediction of other scholarly patterns, e.g., co-citations or academic collaboration.

URL : https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.06816

Decentralized creation of academic documents using a Network Attached Storage (NAS) server

Authors : Johannes Wilm, Afshin Sadeghi, Christoph Lange, Philipp Mayr

Scholarly document creation continues to face various obstacles. Scholarly text production requires more complex word processors than other forms of texts because of the complex structures of citations, formulas and figures.

The need for peer review, often single-blind or double-blind, creates needs for document management that other texts do not require. Additionally, the need for collaborative editing, security and strict document access rules means that many existing word processors are imperfect solutions for academics.

Nevertheless, most papers continue to be written using Microsoft Word (Sadeghi et al. 2017).

We here analyze some of the problems with existing academic solutions and then present an argument why we believe that running an open source academic writing solution for academic purposes, such as Fidus Writer, on a Network Attached Storage (NAS) server could be a viable alternative.

URL : https://arxiv.org/abs/1706.04185

Opening Scholarly Communication in Social Sciences by Connecting Collaborative Authoring to Peer Review

Authors : Afshin Sadeghi, Johannes Wilm, Philipp Mayr, Christoph Lange

The objective of the OSCOSS research project on « Opening Scholarly Communication in the Social Sciences » is to build a coherent collaboration environment that facilitates scholarly communication workflows of social scientists in the roles of authors, reviewers, editors and readers. This paper presents the implementation of the core of this environment: the integration of the Fidus Writer academic word processor with the Open Journal Systems (OJS) submission and review management system.

URL : https://arxiv.org/abs/1703.04428