Mots-clefs: Africa Afficher/masquer les discussions | Raccourcis clavier

  • Hans Dillaerts le 15 November 2013 à 22 h 52 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: Africa, , ,   

    Providing Access to Electronic Theses and Dissertations: A Case Study from Togo :

    « Open access has become a significant part of scientific communication. With regards to dissemination of scientific production, the green road, i.e. self-archiving of scientific work in an open access repository, is often considered as the choice for developing countries because of lower investment and operational costs. This paper will provide a review of relevant literature on the topic, followed by a short overview of open repositories in sub-Saharan African countries, a region facing serious political, economic and social challenges. The main section will present a project for the digitizing of PhD theses of two universities in Togo, and we will then discuss questions and problems related to the specific conditions of the project, in order to contribute to the understanding of the dynamics and rich diversity of the open access movement. Is there an option for sustainable development of open access in these countries? The future will show whether open access contributes to reducing the digital divide between sub-Saharan Africa and other countries or whether it will instead consolidate this divide. »

    URL : http://www.dlib.org/dlib/november13/schopfel/11schopfel.html

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 10 April 2013 à 14 h 43 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: Africa, , , ,   

    Opening access to agricultural information in Ghana, Kenya and Zambia :

    « Agricultural innovation systems in Africa need to have access to both local and global agricultural sciences and technical information if they are to have an impact on agriculture and food security initiatives on the continent. While access to global agricultural information resources and innovations is relatively easy, local agricultural content is generally not visible and easily accessible. Providing access these important resources, through institutional repositories of metadata records and associated full-text documents, is one pathway of ensuring that the content generated locally is easily accessible within the country, region and around the globe. This paper highlights three initiatives implemented by national research institutes in Ghana, Kenya and Zambia aimed at opening access to agricultural information and knowledge resources. It also presents the major challenges faced in the implementation of the initiatives and the key lessons learned that could be useful when implementing similar initiatives. »

    URL : http://eprints.rclis.org/18921/

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 23 March 2013 à 13 h 13 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: Africa, ,   

    Open Access Initiatives in Africa — Structure, Incentives and Disincentives :

    « Building open access in Africa is imperative not only for African scholars and researchers doing scientific research but also for the expansion of the global science and technology knowledgebase. This paper examines the structure of homegrown initiatives, and observes very low level of awareness prevailing in the higher educational institutions and research institutes, organizations and governments. Increasing penetration of internet as well as growing proficiency in its use account for any evidence of OA movement in the region. The absence of interest and willingness of governments and policy makers to take a role in building the movement in the region makes any observed progress a fragmented one. »

    URL : http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2012.11.024

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 26 November 2012 à 18 h 22 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: Africa, , ,   

    Awareness and Use of Open Access Scholarly Publications by LIS Lecturers in Southern Nigeria :

    « The study examined the awareness and use of open access scholarly publications by Library and Information Science (LIS) lecturers in southern Nigeria. Based on this, three (3) objectives were set out for the study. The descriptive survey design was employed and the questionnaire entitled “Awareness and Use of Open Access to Scholarly Publications Questionnaire” (AUOASPQ) was administered on the entire population of 141 LIS lecturers from which 114 responses were successfully collected. The data collected were analyzed using frequency counts, percentages, mean and regression analysis. The study revealed a high level of usage of open access publications by both senior and junior LIS lecturers and that the awareness of open access concepts accounts for the tendency of LIS lecturers in southern Nigeria to use open access publications. The study recommends that efforts should be geared towards inculcating the awareness and use of open access especially through enabling infrastructure and enacting policies such as mandatory deposit of scholarly works in open access archives. »

    URL : http://article.sapub.org/10.5923.j.library.20120104.02.html

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 23 November 2012 à 18 h 14 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: Africa, , ,   

    Scientific Publishing in West Africa: A Comparison of Benin with Senegal and Ghana :

    « We compared scientific indicators related to Benin, Senegal and Ghana. We collected data from Web of Science and used indicators like the yearly productivity, the language of publication, the type of publication, the citable documents, the publication fields, and the main international partners as well as the percentage of papers in collaboration. Results showed that Benin productivity is the lowest one; Ghana and Senegal competed over the period; depending on the type of documents under consideration, the positions of the three countries vary. Citable documents had an increasing trend for all the countries. There is less cooperation between African countries and Benin, Senegal and Ghana; colonial ties count much in their international partnership. Cooperation among the three countries is negligible. »

    URL : http://2012.sticonference.org/Proceedings/vol2/Megnigbeto_Scientific_589.pdf

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 17 May 2012 à 14 h 26 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: , Africa,   

    Digital Librarians and the Challenges of Open Access to Knowledge: The Michael Okpara University of Agriculture (MOUAU) Library Experience :

    « The development of Internet technology has provided academic and research institutions with a very high level of visibility on the web. As a result, teaching, learning and research is widely improved in the global society today. The intellectual call for knowledge and information dissemination by countless organizations and educational meetings has given birth to a terminology called open access. This initiative is aimed at bringing the knowledge society to a state of free access to all kinds of information and learning material using the Internet and ICT tools. The library plays an important role in sustaining the open access initiative (Das, 2008). Librarians who ensure the organization and dissemination of full-text content of knowledge materials to online communities are the digital librarians. »

    URL : http://unllib.unl.edu/LPP/uzuebgu-mcalbert.htm

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 9 May 2012 à 19 h 01 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: Africa,   

    Perceptions of Public Libraries in Africa :

    « This article presents a summary of some results of the study Perceptions of Public Libraries in Africa which was conducted to research perceptions of stakeholders and the public towards public libraries in six African countries. The study is closely linked with the EIFL Public Library Innovation Programme, which awarded grants to public libraries in developing and transition countries to address a range of socio-economic issues facing their communities, including projects in Kenya, Ghana and Zambia.

    The goal of the study was to understand the perceptions of national and local stakeholders (municipalities, ministries, public agencies, media, etc.) and the public (including non-users) in respect of public libraries in Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe about the potential of public libraries. It also aimed to understand how these stakeholders could best be positively influenced to create, fund, support or to use public libraries. It is hoped that stakeholders in the countries studied will choose to assess the findings as a potential tool to improve library management and advocacy. »

    URL : http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/elbert-et-al

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 8 March 2012 à 14 h 18 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: Africa, , , ,   

    Open Access and Scholarly Publishing: Opportunities and Challenges to Nigerian Researchers :

    « The study examined the extent of researchers’ appreciation of open access scholarly publishing. It discussed the opportunities and the benefits of open access to scholars worldwide. Challenges of OA were discussed and solutions suggested. Four research questions were raised. The population of this study was 140 lecturers from the University of Benin, Nigeria. The study revealed that the respondents had cited open access journals articles and that the major benefit derived from using open access journals is that it provides free online access to the literature necessary for research. »

    URL : http://www.white-clouds.com/iclc/cliej/cl33IO.pdf

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 3 December 2011 à 21 h 34 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: Africa, , , ,   

    Beyond open access : opportunities for scholarly communication innovations in Africa :

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  • Hans Dillaerts le 4 October 2011 à 18 h 33 min Permalien
    Mots-clefs: accès au droit, access to law, Africa, Afrique de l’Ouest, , communication custom, coutume, diffusion, dissemination, infrastructure, infrastructures, , originally, originellement, pluralism, pluralisme, précolonial, West Africa   

    Diffusion du droit et Internet en Afrique de l’Ouest :

    « L’accès au droit en Afrique de l’Ouest est difficile et restreint, et cela pour de nombreuses raisons. Parmi celles-ci peut être citée la faible diffusion papier des ressources juridiques nationales, qui est en partie due au manque de moyens matériels et financiers. Or, depuis une dizaine d’années, des projets de diffusion des ressources juridiques via Internet se développent, donnant ainsi un accès libre aux informations juridiques publiques. Ce mode de diffusion du droit représente une alternative pour les États africains, leur permettant de bâtir de nouvelles stratégies favorisant l’accès au droit. Néanmoins, ce nouveau mode de diffusion du droit fait ressurgir une réflexion relative à la nature plurale des droits ouest africains et de la place des droits originellement africains dans ces nouvelles stratégies.La présente analyse montre que l’utilisation des nouvelles technologies, telles qu’Internet, dans des stratégies de diffusion du droit est pertinente, à la condition que les États africains redéfinissent leur culture juridique, en prenant en considération les sources originellement africaines afin qu’elles prennent place dans la diffusion du droit via Internet.

    Access to legal information in West Africa is difficult and restricted because of a weak dissemination network. The insufficient publication and distribution of national legal resources can partly be attributed to a lack of financial and material resources. Over the past ten years, legal resource publication projects on the Web have been developed to offer free access to public legal information. This type of document dissemination model represents an alternative solution for African States by allowing them to elaborate new strategies to increase legal information dissemination. This new law publishing model, however, has brought about the need to reconsider the pluralistic nature of West African laws and the place these originally African laws occupy within the new strategies being put forth. The following analysis demonstrates how the use of new technologies such as the Internet has proven to be relevant for legal resource publication and distribution insofar as African states always take into consideration originally African sources when redefining their legal cultures through the dissemination of their laws via the Internet. »

    URL : http://www.lex-electronica.org/articles/v11-1/tagodoe.pdf

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