Building an Open Data Repository: Lessons and Challenge

Author : Limor Peer

The Internet has transformed scholarly research in many ways. Open access to data and other research output has been touted as a crucial step toward transparency and quality in science. This paper takes a critical look at what it takes to share social science research data, from the perspective of a small data repository at Yale University’s Institution for Social and Policy Studies.

The ISPS Data Archive was built to create an open access digital collection of social science experimental data, metadata, and associated files produced by ISPS researchers, for the purpose of replication of research findings, further analysis, and teaching.

This paper describes the development of the ISPS Data Archive and discusses the inter-related challenges of replication, integration, and stewardship. It argues that open data requires effort, investment of resources, and planning. By itself, it does not enhance knowledge.

URL : http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1931048

Visibility of the scientific production of the University of León (ULE), Spain

This study measured the international visibility of the ULE research output and the importance of the journals in which ULE researchers published their work, based on the references indexed in international databases (Scopus, WoS, Academic Search, Biosis, Biological Abstracts, PubMed, Francis and FSTA), from 1998 to 2006.

The total production between 1998-2006 was 2,317 documents (2,005 articles and 108 conference papers). ULE’s research in science and technology is more represented in databases than social sciences and humanities. An increasing presence of ULE research in international databases is observed.

High collaboration level among authors (groups of 4 – 5), but mainly internal within ULE (69.49%). More than 75% of the articles have been referenced in JCR (WoS) or SJR (Scopus). The coverage of journals in which ULE researchers published is higher in Scopus, but WoS indexed more papers.

URL : http://eprints.rclis.org/19496/